Review: The Inexplicables


Usually, I try not to read a book that’s in the middle of a series before I’ve read all the books before it, but with Cherie Priest’s The Inexplicables, I made an exception. (It’s the fourth volume in her so far five-volume Clockwork Century series.) I was lured in by the cover, the intriguing portrait of a punkish redhead wearing a gas mask (yes, I bought a book for its cover). I also was lured by the back-cover synopsis. How could a book about narcotics, toxic walled cities, undead and other monsters be bad?

And, I wasn’t wrong. Sometimes you can judge a book by it’s cover. The Inexplicables delivers everything it claims in its cover synopsis: a rousing adventure in altered 1880s toxic, walled Seattle, a place where walking dead rotters roam the streets, the opiate sap is a fix for its residents and something inexplicable and hairy chases after young orphans. Or at least one orphan, Rector “Wreck’em” Sherman, the drug-addled redhead who seeks his fortune and maybe his next fix within the walled city.

His leap into adulthood includes an encounter with a monster, known in the beginning, as The Inexplicable, an oversized humanoid creature on the loose inside the city walls. In Rector’s quest to find his way in this bizarre world, he hooks up with an even stranger cast that includes an Indian princess and an airship crew.

For much of the book, the adventure hinges on Rector and gang trying to find The Inexplicable. They are interrupted in a secondary task, trying to stop a band of outsiders from blowing up the city. To me, this subplot tends to take over and the search for the monster takes a disappointing side quest. I wanted to know more about the creature, once it’s discovered

Still, it’s a fun read, and a nice introduction not only to Priest, but for me to steampunk, an SF genre I had mostly avoided, other than admiring steampunkish costumes at cons. Priest uses a lush, vivid prose to make this world come to life and I’m looking forward to working my way back to the first novel in the series, Boneshaker. She also manages to work in references to previous books in the series without distractions. A nice technique for those writing series.

— Todd

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